Line 6 Helix VS Helix LT (direct comparison)

The Line 6 Helix series, is responsible for producing some of the most comprehensive and highly functional multi-effects pedals currently available on the market. In this analysis, we will be contrasting the Line 6 Helix, the company’s most popular product, with the Helix LT, which can be thought of as the “lite” version of the Helix.

But what specifically differentiates the two from one another?

The Helix costs an additional $500 compared to the Helix LT; the question is whether or not this supplemental expenditure is justified. What aspects of the Helix are not included in the LT version?

When it comes to making a decision between the two of them, the most important question to ask yourself is: which of the two is the option that best suits your needs?

Before we get started, it is essential to point out that the Helix LT is in no way “lite” in the sense that we typically understand the term. It is missing some of the bells and whistles that come standard on the Helix, but other than that, it has nearly all of the essential features that are responsible for the greatness of that product. Our recommendation is that you forego the Helix XT and instead spend the extra $500 on the Helix LT.

But if you don’t want to take our word for it, we’ll go over the comparison in great detail and give you all the information that we have.

On the back panel, one of the most significant areas in which the Helix and the Helix LT differ from one another is in the number of input and output (i/o) options that are available to the former model, which may or may not be required by the user.

The following is a list of connections that are available in the Helix but are not available in the Helix LT:

Input from the microphone (XLR)

Multiple send/return connections

S/PDIF Aux Input

Multiple expression connections

On the front panel, the Helix provides LED labels for each bypass switch, whereas the Helix LT does not have these labels. This is another important difference between the two models. However, the two control panels for the Helix are virtually identical to one another.

Line 6 Helix LT Details

The Helix LT provides access to the same variety of presets, effects, and amp/cab models as the standard Helix. It is also possible to confirm, by merely looking at photographs, that the front control panel of the Helix is identical.

Take note that the LED labels are not present on any of the switches. After I had selected all of my presents, I would use nothing more than a piece of masking tape and a marker, despite the fact that this solution is somewhat less convenient.

As I mentioned when discussing the Helix, the Helix LT makes the majority of its cost-cutting modifications to the back panel, which can be easily seen in the following image:

Having said that, there is nothing missing from the back panel of the Helix LT that is significantly different from the original Helix. The LT comes equipped with XLR inputs and outputs, instrument inputs and outputs, and MIDI connections.

It truly has everything that I could possibly want in a multi-effects pedal and even more than that!

Even with all of its positive qualities, the Helix does not provide sufficient value to justify spending an additional $500 on what is already a pricey floor pedal.

Because of this, we suggest going with the Helix LT rather than the standard Helix.

Which one is the Summary and the Conclusion?

We might be more inclined to go in that direction if Line 6 priced the Helix lower than the Helix LT, perhaps by $200 to $300 more than the latter. Line 6 does a really good job with the Helix LT, giving you a discount option that strips away bells and whistles without impacting the core functionality. This is the bottom line.

Because of this, making a choice is not too difficult for us. Our advice is to go with the Helix LT, and you shouldn’t lose any sleep over the decision.

The Line 6 Helix series, is responsible for producing some of the most comprehensive and highly functional multi-effects pedals currently available on the market. In this analysis, we

will be contrasting the Line 6 Helix, the company’s most popular product, with the Helix LT, which can be thought of as the “lite” version of the Helix.

But what specifically differentiates the two from one another?

The Helix costs an additional $500 compared to the Helix LT; the question is whether or not this supplemental expenditure is justified. What aspects of the Helix are not included in the LT version?

When it comes to making a decision between the two of them, the most important question to ask yourself is: which of the two is the option that best suits your needs?

Before we get started, it is essential to point out that the Helix LT is in no way “lite” in the sense that we typically understand the term. It is missing some of the bells and whistles that come standard on the Helix, but other than that, it has nearly all of the essential features that are responsible for the greatness of that product. Our recommendation is that you forego the Helix XT and instead spend the extra $500 on the Helix LT.

But if you don’t want to take our word for it, we’ll go over the comparison in great detail and give you all the information that we have.

On the back panel, one of the most significant areas in which the Helix and the Helix LT differ from one another is in the number of input and output (i/o) options that are available to the former model, which may or may not be required by the user.

The following is a list of connections that are available in the Helix but are not available in the Helix LT:

Input from the microphone (XLR)

Multiple send/return connections

S/PDIF Aux Input

Multiple expression connections

On the front panel, the Helix provides LED labels for each bypass switch, whereas the Helix LT does not have these labels. This is another important difference between the two models. However, the two control panels for the Helix are virtually identical to one another.

Line 6 Helix LT Details

The Helix LT provides access to the same variety of presets, effects, and amp/cab models as the standard Helix. It is also possible to confirm, by merely looking at photographs, that the front control panel of the Helix is identical.

Take note that the LED labels are not present on any of the switches. After I had selected all of my presents, I would use nothing more than a piece of masking tape and a marker, despite the fact that this solution is somewhat less convenient.

As I mentioned when discussing the Helix, the Helix LT makes the majority of its cost-cutting modifications to the back panel, which can be easily seen in the following image:

Having said that, there is nothing missing from the back panel of the Helix LT that is significantly different from the original Helix. The LT comes equipped with XLR inputs and outputs, instrument inputs and outputs, and MIDI connections.

It truly has everything that I could possibly want in a multi-effects pedal and even more than that!

Even with all of its positive qualities, the Helix does not provide sufficient value to justify spending an additional $500 on what is already a pricey floor pedal.

Because of this, we suggest going with the Helix LT rather than the standard Helix.

Which one is the Summary and the Conclusion?

We might be more inclined to go in that direction if Line 6 priced the Helix lower than the Helix LT, perhaps by $200 to $300 more than the latter. Line 6 does a really good job with the Helix LT, giving you a discount option that strips away bells and whistles without impacting the core functionality. This is the bottom line.

Because of this, making a choice is not too difficult for us. Our advice is to go with the Helix LT, and you shouldn’t lose any sleep over the decision.

This entry was posted in Blog.

Leave a Reply